Yogendra Nath Yogi

Power of Mantras

Mantras are Sanskrit-invocations of the Supreme Being. Reinforced and propelled by Japa meditation, they pass from the verbal level through the mental and telepathic states, and on to pure thought energy. Of all languages, Sanskrit most closely approaches telepathic language because of its affinity to the fifty primeval sounds. It is the most direct way to approach the transcendental state.

The efficiency of the Japa is accentuated according to the degree of concentration. The mind should be fixed on the source. Then only you will realize the maximum benefits of a Mantra. Every Mantra has a tremendous force. A mantra is a mass of Tejas or radiant energy. It transforms the mental substance by producing a Particular thought movement. The rhythmical vibrations produced by repeating the Mantra, regulate the unsteady vibrations of the five sheaths. It checks the natural tendencies of objective thought of the mind. It helps the spiritual power and reinforces it.

Mantras cannot be concocted or tailor-made for the individual, despite some current claims. They have always existed in a latent state as sound energies. Just as gravity was discovered but not invented by Newton, Mantras were revealed to the ancient masters. They have been codified in the scriptures and handed down from guru to disciple. Although it is customary for the guru when giving initiation to accept voluntary offerings of fruit, flowers or money, the selling of Mantras is strictly against all spiritual rules.

Neither Mantra, deity nor guru, once chosen, should be changed. There are many paths up the mountain. Perseverance on one alone will bring the aspirant to the top faster than if he were to spread his energies in exploring all the alternative paths.

 

 

Saguna Mantra's

Mantras are Sanskrit-invocations of the Supreme Being. Reinforced and propelled by japa meditation, they pass from the verbal level through the mental and telepathic states, and on to pure thought energy. Of all languages, Sanskrit most closely approaches telepathic language because of its affinity to the fifty primeval sounds. It is the most direct way to approach the transcendental state.

Mantras cannot be concocted or tailor-made for the individual, despite some current claims. They have always existed in a latent state as sound energies. Just as gravity was discovered but not invented by Newton, Mantras were revealed to the ancient masters. They have been codified in the scriptures and handed down from guru to disciple. Although it is customary for the guru when giving initiation to accept voluntary offerings of fruit, flowers or money, the selling of Mantras is strictly against all spiritual rules

Neither Mantra, deity nor guru, once chosen, should be changed. There are many paths up the mountain. Perseverance on one alone will bring the aspirant to the top faster than if he were to spread his energies in exploring all the alternative paths.0


SAGUNA MANTRAS

Mantras used by spiritual aspirants to achieve God- Realization are called deity Mantras. They are saguna, with qualities or form producing, and aid the conceptualization process, just as do visual symbols. In time, recitation gives rise to the actual form of the particular deity.

As a specialized sound body of consciousness, the Mantra is the deity itself. The form of the deity manifests as the visible portion of the sound. The Mantra, therefore, must be repeated in the proper way, with attention to the syllables and rhythm. If translated, it ceases to be a Mantra because sound vibrations newly created in translation cannot evoke it. Only the rhythmical vibrations of the Sanskrit syllables properly recited can regulate the unsteady vibrations of the worshipper and permit the form of the deity to arise.

Westerners are prone to think that the various Mantras refer to different gods, and that there is a wide diversity in the culminating experience. It must never be forgotten that the deities are aspects of the one Divinity whose grandeur is too vast for the mind to comprehend at the beginning of spiritual practice. To use again the analogy of the hill, the many paths to the top can be viewed as the worship of the various aspects of the God. The hill itself is the one hill, and the summit is the same. After reaching the pinnacle, one will have the vision to encompass the totality.

Every true Mantra fulfills six conditions. 1) It was originally revealed to the sage, who achieved Self-Realization through it and passed it down to others. 2) It has a presiding deity and 3) a specific meter. 4) It possesses a bija, or seed, investing it with a special power that is the essence of the Mantra. 5) It also has dynamic divine power, or shakti. 6) Lastly, there is a plug that conceals the pure consciousness hidden in the Mantra. As soon as the plug is removed by constant prolonged repetition, pure consciousness is revealed, and the devotee receives the vision of his deity.

All devotees are really worshipping the same Supreme Atman. Differences are only the differences in worshippers. These differences arise from the need for multiplicity in approach to Godhead. Various temperaments are attracted to particular manifestations of the Divine. Some people are drawn by silence, others by activity; some lose themselves in nature, others in intellectual abstractions. One can approach God more easily if there is a compatible relationship with the most suitable manifestation. Harmony between aspirant and chosen deity is essential. However, the goal will be reached only when one can see his chosen deity in all deities and in all beings.

At the time of initiation by a guru, one’s deity or ishta devata is chosen. Every person has worshipped some deity in previous lives; the impression of this worship is imprinted in the subconscious mind. These impressions have influenced the mental vibrations and have helped to form the particular mentality. Worship of Lord Siva in a previous birth would incline one to Siva worship in this life also; it would impart certain mental characteristics, such as stoicism and love of solitude. One who chooses Siva, as his ishta devata would be most drawn to abstract forms of thought and meditation as his method of worship.

The householder to whom family, responsibility, order and ideals are important is drawn to Rama, the ideal son, husband and lawgiver. Krishna attracts most people, particularly devotional types and active, balanced extroverts who are concerned with the welfare of others. As the mischievous baby, a young man engaged in divine play in the fields and forests of Vrindavan, and inspired giver of the wisdom of the Bhagavad Gita, his range is all-inclusive. Those who feel reverence for the Mother aspect as divine universal energy might worship Durga. If one cannot discover his own natural inclination, the guru will choose the deity in accordance with his insight.

Once the deity and appropriate Mantra have been selected, and the aspirant has received initiation, he works with the Mantra until reaching enlightenment. The Mantra becomes his theme song, so to speak. He makes his vibrations his own, and to the extent that he can do this, he is drawn closer to God.

Other deity Mantras can also be used in a supplementary way, such as foe acquiring particular attributes. Repetition of OM Aim Saraswatyai Namah bestows wisdom, intelligence and creative achievement. OM Sri Maha Lakshmyai Namah confers wealth and prosperity. The Ganesha Mantra removes obstacles in any undertaking.

The Maha Mrityunjaya Mantra prevents accidents, incurable disease and calamities, and bestows longevity and immortality. It is also a moksha Mantra, bringing liberation. Those who do japa of it daily will enjoy health, long life and ultimate enlightenment. The translation of this powerful Mantra is: “We bow to the three- eyed Lord (Siva) who is full of sweet fragrance, who nourishes human being. May he free me from the bondage of births and deaths, just as the ripe cucumber is separated from the vine, and may I be fixed in immortality.”

The Gayatri Mantra is the supreme Mantra of the Vedas. It is the one Mantra that can be commonly prescribed for all, for Gayatri is the Mother of the universe, Shakti herself, and there is nothing she cannot do. Her Mantra purifies the mind; destroys pain, sin and ignorance; brings liberation; and bestows health, beauty, strength, vitality, power, intelligence and magnetic aura.

Repetition of the Gayatri Mantra, OM Namah Sivaya, OM Namo Narayanaya, or OM Namo Bhagavate Vasudevaya 125000 times, with feeling, faith, and devotion secures for the devotee the grace of the presiding deity. OM Sri Ramaya Namah and OM Namo Bhagavate Vasudevaya enable one to attain realization of God with attributes first, and subsequently realization without attributes.

Meditation with Mantra

There are various practical aids to progress in japa meditation that have been tested for thousands of years and are based on sound psychological and natural principles.

The telling of rosary beads is the form of japa most familiar to Western experience. A japa mala, similar to rosary, is often used in Mantra repetition. It helps to foster alertness, acts as a focus for the physical energy and is and aid to rhythmic, continuous recitation. It consists of 108 beads. An additional bead, the meru, is slightly larger than the others. It is the signal indicating that with one Mantra recited for each bead, japa has been done 108 times, or one mala. The fingers should not cross the meru. When it is reached, the beads are reversed in the hand; one continues reciting the Mantra, moving the mala in the opposite direction. The thumb and the third finger roll the beads; the index finger, which is physically negative, is never used. The rosary must not be allowed to hang below the navel, and should be wrapped in a clean cloth when not in use.

An appropriate prayer before beginning induces purity of feeling. Wit eyes closed and concentration focused either between the eyebrows on the ajna chakra or on the anahata chakra of the heart, one should invoke the aid of his chosen deity and guru. The Mantra must be pronounced distinctly and without mistakes, for it and the deity itself are one and the same thing. Repetition must be neither too fast nor too slow, and thought must be given to its meaning. Speed should be increased only when the mind begins to wander. Because the mind will naturally try to drift away after a time, it is necessary to keep alert throughout the practice.

Variety in japa is necessary to sustain interest, avoid fatigue and counteract the monotony that can arise from constant repetition of the same syllables. This can be provided by modifying the volume. The Mantra can be repeated aloud for a while, then whispered, and then recited mentally. The mind needs variety or it becomes tired. However, even mechanical repetition that is devoid of feeling has a great purifying effect. Feeling will come later, as the process of purification continues.

Audible repetition is called vaikhari japa, while that done by whispering or humming is termed upamsu japa. The Mental repetition, manasika japa, is the most powerful; it requires keener concentration, for the mind tends to shut off after a period of time. The advantage of loud japa, which should be used with discretion, is that it shuts out all worldly sound and distractions. One should alternate when necessary, particularly when drowsiness sets in.

Unaccustomed to this kind of activity, the beginner at first may find himself giving up too soon, after five or ten minutes of repeating the Mantra. The syllables in this case may sound meaningless--mere syllables and nothing more. But by persevering for at least half and hour without interruption, he will give the Mantra time to work itself into his consciousness, and benefits will be felt in a few days.

Meditation on the image of the chosen deity while the Mantra is being repeated adds tremendously to the efficacy of japa. Sound and form correspond and reinforce each other. Sound vibrations alone, if made with care and devotion, are capable of producing the form in the consciousness of the aspirant. The process can be greatly facilitated by visualizing the deity in the heart area or the space between the eyebrows. With the visualization, there should be awareness of the various attributes of the deity. Feel that the Lord is seated within, emanating purity to the heart and mind, and manifesting his presence by the power of the Mantra.

Thus, in meditating on Siva, the physical energy is focused on rolling the mala beads. The image of the deity, with the third eye and the symbolic crescent moon, serpents, trident, drums, etc. occupies the mind on one level. The Mantra OM Namah Sivaya is simultaneously being repeated, and on another level is being embedded in the consciousness. Repetition of Mantra has a cumulative effect, and with continued practice it gains in power. It should be evident that japa meditation is far more than a verbal exercise. It is a state of complete absorption.

Concluding prayer and rest are important. When japa practice is finished, it is advisable not to plunge immediately into worldly activity. Sitting quietly for about ten minutes, one should reflect on the Lord and feel His presence. As routine duties are commenced, the spiritual vibrations will remain intact. This current should be maintained at all times, no matter what one is engaged in.

When doing manual work, give the hands to work but give the mind to God. Like a woman who continuous knitting while talking to her friends, one can sustain mental japa. With practice, the manual work will become automatic. When the Mantra can be repeated throughout the day, God consciousness will permeate one’s life.

Mantra writing, likhita japa, is another, supplementary form of japa. The Mantra should be written with a special pen and notebook, which have been set-aside for this purpose. It should be done for half an hour, during which time complete silence and concentration are observed. While writing, simultaneously repeat the Mantra mentally so that the impression made in the consciousness will be intensified. Likhita japa may be done in any language or script. It greatly helps the aspirant to concentrate and leads to meditation. This practice helps to set up a continuous vibration of divine energy that guides and protects, regardless of what one is doing.

Advanced meditation should not be attempted without the guidance of guru. Bija Mantras and certain mystic Mantras, such as the Sri Vidya, should not be repeated by those who are not well acquainted with them and with the Sanskrit language. When improperly repeated, they can actually bring harm to the psychic system. Those who are not qualified, and who do not have access to a guru, who has broken the power of these advanced Mantra, should concentrate on their own Mantras.

Deity Mantras are used for purascharana, which is concentrated japa meditation extended over a long period of time. When performing a purascharana, the aspirant sets aside a number of hours each day for japa. The Mantra is repeated 1,00,000 times for each syllable of the Mantra. The Mantra is repeated with feeling, and in a particular manner with the right observance, until the fixed number of Mantras has been recited. Slow repetition of Maha Mantra may take as long as three years to finish. The practitioner must observe certain rules and regulations lay down in the scriptures in regard to purascharana and must observe perfect dietary discipline in accordance with those injunctions.

Anushathana is the practice of religious austerity for the sake of obtaining some object or goal, the highest being spiritual. For the success, the desire should be spiritual, and it should be kept in view throughout the practice. The rigor of the austerity, which may be various kinds, depends on the constitution and health of the aspirant.

For japa anushathana, a deity Mantra should be selected in accordance with the desired goal. Although his personal deity might be Krishna, if one wanted to compose sublime music, he would repeat the Mantra for Saraswati; if he wished his spiritual obstacles to be removed, he would select a Ganesha Mantra. Japa meditation is then performed for a protracted period, with intense concentration of mind and no thought of the external world. This leads to achievement of the desired goal.

There may be other types of japa meditation, but the broad theory and techniques do not greatly vary. Approached with faith and devotion, and carried out with perseverance, japa is the most direct path to God-Realization.

Nirguna Mantra

Mantras are Sanskrit-invocations of the Supreme Being. Reinforced and propelled by japa meditation, they pass from the verbal level through the mental and telepathic states, and on to pure thought energy. Of all languages, Sanskrit most closely approaches telepathic language because of its affinity to the fifty primeval sounds. It is the most direct way to approach the transcendental state.

Mantras cannot be concocted or tailor-made for the individual, despite some current claims. They have always existed in a latent state as sound energies. Just as gravity was discovered but not invented by Newton, Mantras were revealed to the ancient masters. They have been codified in the scriptures and handed down from guru to disciple. Although it is customary for the guru when giving initiation to accept voluntary offerings of fruit, flowers or money, the selling of Mantras is strictly against all spiritual rules.

Neither Mantra, deity nor guru, once chosen, should be changed. There are many paths up the mountain. Perseverance on one alone will bring the aspirant to the top faster than if he were to spread his energies in exploring all the alternative paths.

NIRGUNA MANTRAS

As saguna Mantras have form, nirguna Mantras are without form. There are no deities or personalized aspects of God to be invoked. Rather, one uses the abstract Mantras and Vedantic formulas to assert identification with all the creation. Because people are of many different temperaments, not all spiritual aspirants are drawn to a personal deity. Many perceive the universe as diverse energy patterns, all connected and interrelated, and stemming from one Source or Primal Cause.

For this type of temperament, the abstract mantra creates a vibration in which the meditator identifies with the whole of the Cosmos. With the repetition of one of these Mantras, the meditator loses his individual identity and merges with nature. He avows that he is identical with that homogeneous substratum, that energy or power of existence, which underlies and permeates all that exists.

All Mantras are hidden in OM, which is the abstract, highest Mantra of the cosmos. OM is the manifest symbol of the Sabdabrahaman vibration, or God; but it must not be equated with the Divine. The universe has come from OM, rests in OM and dissolves in it. AUM, as it is sometimes written, covers the threefold experience of man; A represents the physical plane, U represents the mental and astral plane, and M represents the deep sleep state and everything beyond reach of the intellect. The transcendental sound of OM is heard only by Yogis, not by the ordinary ear.

Letters of the alphabet are emanations from OM, which is the root of all sounds and letters. A is the first sound the vocal apparatus can utter, and M is the last. In between is the middle range of U. The three sounds comprising OM encompass all sound. There is no language, music or poetry outside its range. Not only does all language and thought arise from this word, but also the energy vibrations of the universe itself.

Because of its universality, OM can be used as a Mantra by all who are unable to find a guru. However, its very universality and lack of particular form make it very difficult for a beginner to grasp. The mind must be very strong to be able to concentrate on formless and abstract Mantras such as OM.

Japa meditation on OM has a tremendous influence on the mind. Vibrations set up by this word are extremely powerful. By holding the hands over the ears and intoning it, one can experience its vibrations on a rudimentary physical level. No other sound similarly intoned will have the same vibrational power within the head.

Correctly pronounced, the sound proceeds from the navel with a deep and harmonious vibration, and gradually manifests itself at the upper part of the nostrils. The larynx and palate are the sounding boards; no part of the tongue or palate is touched. As the U is pronounced, the sound rolls from the root of the tongue to the end of the sounding board of the mouth. M is the last sound, and is produced by closing the lips. Pronounced merely as spelled OM will have a certain effect upon the nervous system, and will benefit the psyche. Pronounced correctly, it arouses and transforms every atom in the physical body, setting up new vibrations and awakening dormant physical and mental powers.

Just as the various deities are aspects of One Supreme, so the various bija, or seed Mantras are aspects of the supreme Mantra, OM. Bija Mantras are seed letters directly derived from the fifty primeval sounds, and are very powerful. Generally a bija Mantra consists of a single letter, although some, such as HREEM, are compounded. Each has a significant inner mystic meaning, although on the surface the sound itself appears to have no meaning at all. Each element of the universe has its corresponding bija. The sounds for ether, air, fire, water and earth are, respectively, HAM, YAM, RAM, VAM and LAM. Every deity also has its own deed syllable. Because of their innate force, bija Mantras generally are not given for initiation. Japa on them may be practiced by those who are in a pure state, and their use is preceded by intricate rituals. 

 

SPIRITUALITY NATH YOGA- GURU GORAKHNATH- UNDER CLIK